Anneliese Maier Research Award Prize Ceremony

l to r: my host Prof. Dr. Monique Scheer, Cornelia Quennet-Thielen, State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, me, and Helmut Schwarz, President of the Humboldt Foundation.
l to r: my host Prof. Dr. Monique Scheer, Cornelia Quennet-Thielen, State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, me, and Helmut Schwarz, President of the Humboldt Foundation.

On the fifteenth of September I received the Anneliese Maier Research Award in Leipzig, Germany. For more information on the prize and the other prizewinners, see the Humboldt Foundation’s press release.

More details about our first workshop will be coming soon.

Just published: Matt King & Pamela Klassen, “Suppressing the Mad Elephant: Missionaries, Lamas, and the Mediation of Sacred Historiographies in the Tibetan Borderlands”

This article was a lot of fun to write, and we hope it is enjoyable to read. Matt King, a scholar of Tibetan and Mongolian Buddhism, asked me one day if I could help him to figure out the identity of a mysterious man from “Eng-a-leng” who appears in an account of an 1889 meeting between a Tibetan Lama and a Christian missionary transcribed by a Mongolian monk in the early twentieth century. The results of our detective work are here, in the journal History and Anthropology.

Religion and Public Memory in Multicultural Societies

Thanks to the support of the Anneliese Maier Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation of Germany, I will be developing a new collaborative project over the next five years, working closely with Prof. Dr. Monique Scheer of the University of Tübingen, as well as colleagues and students at the University of Toronto. We will be exploring how religion is part of the stories that sites of public memory–such as museums, monuments, and virtual spaces–tell of a nation’s past, and in turn, how contemporary conditions of religious diversity shape how and when such stories are told. For more information, please see here.

Upcoming lectures this week at U of T: John Borrows, Matt Hedstrom, and Audra Simpson

There are three great lectures to attend this week. On January 29, 12 -2, John Borrows will speak on “Living Legal Traditions: Indigenous Law in Practice”. Then at 4:15, Matt Hedstrom will speak on “Sola Scriptura?: Book History and Religious Authority in the United States”. The next day, January 30,  Audra Simpson speaks at 2 pm on “The State is a Man: Theresa Spence, Loretta Saunders and the Gendered Costs of Settler Sovereignty in Canada”.