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PAST EVENTS

 

2010

Monday, January 25, 5 pm
Michael Morgan (Indiana University), "Levinas, Darwall, and the Second Person Standpoint"
Room 2098, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street)
Sponsored by the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Tikvah Fund, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Thursday, January 28, 2-4 pm
Anna Porter, “The Ghosts of Europe”
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Institute of European Studies, the European Union Centre of Excellence. Funding for this event was provided by the European Commission.

Anna Porter, co-founder of Key Porter Books, had been one of Canada’s most respected book publishers for 30 years. She is an Officer of The Order of Canada and has been awarded the Order of Ontario. Anna Porter’s most recent book is Kasztner’s Train, the True Story of Rezso Kasztner, Unknown Hero of the Holocaust, winner of the 2007 Writers’ Trust Non-Fiction Award and of the Jewish Book Award for Non-Fiction. She has also written three novels: Hidden Agenda, Mortal Sins, and The Bookfair Murders - The Bookfair Murders was made into a feature film – and a memoir, The Storyteller: Memory, Secrets, Magic and Lies, All Ms Porter’s books have been published internationally and in several languages. She is currently working on a manuscript about central Europe twenty years after the collapse of its Communist regimes.

Thursday, February 4, 4-6 pm
Bernard Wasserstein
(University of Chicago), "Hannah Arendt, the Nazis, and the Jews"
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2118
Sponsored by Canada research Chair for German History, The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies, the Department of History, Centre for Jewish Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, Samuel Zacks Chair in Jewish History.

In a recent article in the Times Literary Supplement, Bernard Wasserstein examined Hannah Arendt's credentials as a historian, focusing in particular in her use of Nazi historians as authorities in her "The Origins of Totalitarianism". The essay evoked a storm of controversy and reopened the debate over Arendt's relationship to the Jews and Jewish history that was first ignited a generation ago by the publication of her "Eichmann in Jerusalem". In this lecture Wasserstein considers some of the latest contributions to the debate and the broader implications of the controversy.

Wednesday, March 3, 5:30 pm
The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Lecture in Holocaust Studies
Omer Bartov
(John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History, Brown University), “Genocide in a Multiethnic Town: Event, Origins, Aftermath”
Al Green Theatre, Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, 750 Spadina Avenue
Sponsored by The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies and the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the support of the Department of History, Centre for Jewish Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, Canada Research Chair in Modern German History, Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History and Chair of Ukrainian Studies.

Up until World War II, the Galician town of Buczacz had a mixed population of Poles, Jews and Ukrainians. During the German occupation, Nazi units assisted by Ukrainian police murdered the Jewish inhabitants, while Ukrainian nationalists carried out ethnic cleansing of the Poles. Now part of independent Ukraine, Buczacz is inhabited predominantly by Ukrainians. Professor Bartov traces the complexity of interethnic relations in the town, their impact on the events of 1941-44, and how these events have been remembered and commemorated in the postwar period and following the collapse of communist rule.

Born in Israel and educated at Tel Aviv University and Oxford, Professor Omer Bartov is one of the world's leading authorities on the Holocaust, modern European history and genocide. He made his reputation when he showed the German Army to be a deeply Nazified institution that played a key role in the Holocaust, particularly in the occupied areas of the Soviet Union. His subsequent research focused on links between the extreme violence of World War I and the German war of annihilation in World War II, and on 20th-century genocides. Currently he is investigating interethnic violence in eastern Galicia during World War II. Professor Bartov is the author of seven books including: Erased: Vanishing Traces of Jewish Galicia in Present-Day Ukraine, Germany's War and the Holocaust and Mirrors of Destruction: War, Genocide, and Modern Identity.

Thursday, March 4, 4-6 pm
Lise Howard
(Georgetown University), “US Foreign Policy and the Illiberal Peace”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8618
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Centre for International Studies, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Friday, March 5, 2-4 pm
Marc M. Howard
(Georgetown university), “The Politics of Citizenship in Europe”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8428
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Sunday, March 7, 11 am-5 pm
Ethnographpy, Culture and Oral History of Yiddish Speakers in Contemporary Eastern Europe

  • Alexandra Hoffman (University of Michigan), "Very Little Odessa: Yiddish Renaissance in a Ukrainian Town in the 1990s"
  • Mikhail Krutikov (University of Michigan)
  • Jeffrey Veidlinger (Indiana University), "In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Jewish Memory in Eastern Europe"
  • Maria Kaspina (Russian State University of Humanities), "Evil Eye, Dark Forces and How to Fight Them: Yiddish and Russian Stories of Supernatural among Jews in Ukraine"
  • Jeffrey Kopstein (University of Toronto)
  • Anna Shternshis (University of Toronto)
  • Keith Weiser (York University)
With a special concert performance, Greetings from the Soviet Shtetl, performed by Psoy Korolenko. A multilingual cabaret with songs and videoshow based on Soviet popular hits in Yiddish (at 8pm)
Robert Gill Theatre, Koffler Centre for the Arts, 216 College Street
Sponsored by the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Wednesday, March 10, 4-6 pm
Belinda Davis
(Rutgers University), “'The Times, They are A-Changing': Political Activism in the West German 1960s and '70s"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7891
Sponsored by Canada Research Chair in Modern German History, Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES), Department of History.

Belinda Davis, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University, is author of Home Fires Burning: Food, Politics, and Everyday Life in World War I Berlin (2000), and is completing a book entitled The Internal Life of Politics: The New Left in West Germany, 1962-1983. She is co-editor of Alltag--Erfahrung--Eigensinn: Historisch-anthropologische. Erkundungen(2008) and Changing the World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Transnational Identities in 1960s/70s, West Germany and the U.S (2010).

Thursday, March 11, 3:30-5 pm
Fritz Breithaupt
(Indiana University), "Cultures of Empathy"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8672
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

The talk offers a humanities response to recent work on empathy within the cognitive sciences. Most of these theories assume that the primary scene of empathy involves two people: One who has empathy with another. My hypothesis, however, is that human empathy derives from a scene of three individuals: One individual who observes a conflict between two others. The talk proposes a two-step process: When one person observes a conflict by two others, he or she is likely to mentally choose a side. Empathy is now possible, partly to justify one's choice of taking a side. The second step after the side taking consists in narrating the fate of the chosen person.
The talk will 1) develop this model and provide some psychological evidence (Stockholm Syndrome), 2) indicate how this work relates to individual literary texts, (I will allude to a work of nineteenth-century fiction) and 3) complicate the notion of narration. The latter will allow me to hint at my new project on the "excuse" as a core structure of narrative.

Wednesday, April 7, 4-6 pm
Goldschmidt Memorial Lecture
Wolfram Eilenberger
(University of Toronto), “Polyphonic Voices: Goldschmidt and Bakhtin”
Department of Philosophy, Room 418 Jackman Humanities Building
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures.

April 8-9
Conference: Spatial Practices: Medieval/Modern Conference program
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8287
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Wedensday, April 14, 12-2 pm
Ian Cooper (University of Oslo),
“A Virtual Third Chamber for the EU? National Parliaments Under the Treaty of Lisbon”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8617
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Friday, April 16
Conference: Rethinking German Imperialism
Conference Program
9:30 am-4 pm Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
4-6 pm Keynote: Hartmut Pogge von Strandmann(Oxford University), "Germany's Overseas Imperialism: Colonial Policy in Berlin"
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7949
Sponsored by JIGES/CERES, Canada Research Chairs Foundation, Department of History

Hartmut Pogge von Strandmann is Professor of Modern History at Oxford and Emeritus Fellow of University College, Oxford. He was born in Germany and studied there until he was awarded a scholarship to Oxford in 1962. After that he made his career in England. Last year he published in German Imperialismus vom Grünen Tisch. Deutsche Kolonialpolitik zwischen wirtschaftlicher Ausbeutung und "zvilisatorischen" Bemühungen (Berlin: Ch. Links Verlag, 2009). An English translation should follow soon.

Saturday, April 17, 10 am-3 pm
Conference: Rethinking German Imperialism
Conference Program
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7949
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by by JIGES/CERES, Canada Research Chairs Foundation, Department of History

Monday, April 19, 5-7  pm
Simon Green
(Aston Univesity, UK), “The New German Government: Challenges and Perspectives”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8611
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

September 10, 5-7 pm
Holger Nehring (University of Sheffield), "A Peaceful Europe? Reinterpreting Twentieth-century European History"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the European Union Centre of Excellence, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

Monday, September 13, 4:30 pm
Prof. Dr. Juergen Fohrmann (Rector at the Universität Bonn), "Der Bilderrahmen des Realismus - Fontane im 19. Jahrhundert"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, September 14, 4-6 pm
Marc Olivier Baruch
(Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales
Paris), " 'A Man of His Time': Maurice Papon (1910-2007), Symbol of State Violence in Twentieth-Century France?"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone,  the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and Peace and Conflict Studies

Born in 1957, and a former student of the École polytechnique and the École nationale d'administration, Marc Olivier Baruch has served since 1981 as a civil servant in the French Ministries of Education and Culture and in the Prime Minister's Office. His career shifted to the academic world in 1997 when he became a research fellow in the Centre national de la recherche scientifique. Published the same year, his doctoral thesis about the French Civil Service during WWII (Servir l'État français. L'administration en France de 1940 à 1944) made him a  key expert in the latest post-war trial of the French civil service, French Republic vs Maurice Papon.
In 2003, he was elected  as directeur d'études in the École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS). His teachings and research deal with contemporary European politcal history, especially of the State and the Civil Service. As a specialist of the Vichy regime, he has also published a general story of the period (Le Régime de Vichy, Paris, La Découverte, 1996, translated into German Das Vichy-Regime : Frankreich 1940-1944, Reclam Verlag, 1999), and edited a collective study on the purges of French society after WWII (Une poignée de misérables : l'épuration de la société française après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, Paris, Fayard, 2003). He is currently working on a book dealing with the complex relationship between history, politics and law in contemporary France.

Thursday, September 16, 5-7 pm
Konrad H. Jarausch
(DAAD Visiting Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Reluctant Accomplice: A Wehrmacht Soldier's Letters from the Eastern Front, 1939-1942"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

Konrad H. Jarausch has written or edited more than three dozen books on modern German or European history. Starting with Hitler's seizure of power and the First World War, his research interests have moved via the social history of German students and professions to German unification in 1989/90, with historiography under the Communist GDR, the nature of the East German dictatorship, as well as the debate about historians and the Third Reich. More recently, he has been concerned with the problem of interpreting 20th-century German history in general, the learning processes after 1945, the issue of cultural democratization, the caesura of the 1970s and the transformation of the Humboldt University, 1985-2000. At the same time he has been involved in discussions about quantitative methods in history, problems of postmodernism, and questions of European memory culture. Currently he is beginning to work on a history of the ambivalent face of European modernity in the 20th century.

"The significance of this wartime correspondence lies in the ambivalent role of its author as reluctant accomplice in and clear-eyed witness of important aspects of the war in the East. Although too old to engage in actual fighting, Konrad Jarausch was close enough to the front to provide detailed descriptions of German occupation policy in Poland, graphic comments on the training of new recruits, and shocking accounts of the mass death of Russian POWs, somewhat neglected by the burgeoning Holocaust literature. At the same time, he had the leisure to record sustained reflections on the historical meaning of the war, the prospects of the fighting and the (im-)morality of the German cause that go beyond the usual concerns of soldiers, voiced in letters home. Especially, his conflicted attitude, hoping for and wanting to participate in a German victory while increasingly noticing and being repelled by Nazi brutality, sheds fresh light on the contradictory feelings of decent professionals who supported the war. Finally, his discovery of solidarity with Russian POWs also offers an inspiring example of the possibility of recovering a shared humanity amid catastrophe."

October 8-10
Conference: A Cultural Approach to Human Security
Croft Chapter House, University College (15 King's College Circle)
Program
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, Centre for Comparative Literature, Dean of Arts and Science, UC Drama Program, Drama Centre, Cinema Studies, the University of Toronto, German Consulate of Toronto, German Academic Exchange Service, Goethe-Institut, and the University of Alberta.

October 15, 1-4pm
Capacity-Building Workshop: Across the Divide: Reconnecting the Histories of German Cinema
312-313 Innis College
This workshop is by invitation only.
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures.

October 15, 7:15-9pm
Public Screening: Invisible: Illegal in Europe, dir. Andreas Voigt 2004
312-313 Innis College
The documentary film deals with the situation of illegal migrants in Europe. Question and answer session with the director.
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures.

Thursday, October 28, 4-6 pm
Documentary screening: Bauhaus - Modell und Mythos (Bauhaus - Model and Myth, 1998/2009, 103 min., with subtitles), dir. Dr. Kerstin Stutterheim
Kerstin Stutterheim (Professor of Media Studies, Dramaturgy, and Film Production, Konrad Wolf School of Film and Television, Potsdam, Germany)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures.

October 28-29
Conference: Politics, Exceptionality and "Reach": Writing the History of International Health Agencies, 1921-2005
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, University of Toronto (DAAD grant), Comparative Program in Health and Society, Munk School for Global Affairs, and École des Hautes Études en Santé Publique, Paris and Rennes.

Friday, October 29, 2-4  pm
Martin Kagel (University of Georgia), "'Allowing My Heart to Follow Its Rhythms': On Female Friendship in Eighteenth-Century Germany"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures.

November 5-6
Conference: Germany 1944–1945
Sponsored by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and, at the University of Toronto, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canada Research Chair in Immigration and Governance, and the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies.

Thursday, November 18, 4-6 pm
The Future of German-Jewish History
Michael Brenner (University of Munich), "Through the Lens of Auschwitz: Re-writing the German-Jewish Past in Postwar Germany"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the David Lipson Memorial Fund.

Tuesday, November 23, 5-7 pm
Oksana Tovaryanska
(PhD candidate, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), "Beyond the Official Narratives: Life Stories of the Former Soldiers of the 14th Waffen SS Division Galicia"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Wednesday, November 24, 2-4 pm
DAAD Symposium on Young German Literature
Moritz Rinke
(Author), "Having Fun with History -- Confessions of a Young German Novelist"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service).

Thursday, November 25, 2:15 pm
DAAD Symposium on Young German Literature
Moritz Rinke
(Author), "Contemporary German Theatre: A Playwright's Perspective" (in German)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service).

Friday, December 17, 11-5 pm
Transatlantic Dialogues: Immigration, Citizenship, and Modernity
Randall Hansen (University of Toronto), "Is Multiculturalism Dead?: Angela Merkel's Germany"
Dirk Jacobs (Université Libre de Bruxelles), "Design and Use of the Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX): Germany and Europe"
David Leal (University of Texas at Austin), "Latino Political Influence: Myths, Realities, and Prospects"
Chris Wright (University of Cambridge), "Policy Legacies and Labour Immigration Policy Oscillations in the UK, 1997-2010"
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

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