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PAST EVENTS

2009

Friday, January 23, 12-2 pm
Bradley Naranch
(Stanford University) "Blood and Soil: Scientific Martyrdom, Liberal Nationalism, and the Making of German Africa"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7100
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

Friday, January 30, 12 - 2 pm
Laurie Marhoefer (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, the Jackman Humanities Institute), "Illusionary Liberation? German Politics and Sexuality in the Weimar era, 1918-1933"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7263
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1  Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Laurie Marhoefer is an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Jackman Humanities Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is teaching in the history department.  She has a Ph.D. in History from Rutgers University (2008) and is currently preparing a book manuscript on the politics of so-called "immoral sexuality" in Germany during the Weimar era, 1918-1933

Monday, February 9, 5-7:30
Film screening followed by Q & A with the filmmaker Manfred Becker, "Fatherland" (2006) 76 min.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7253
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1  Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Friday, February 13, 5-7 pm
Roundtable “Was the Bombing of Dresden a War Crime?”

 Participants: Donald L. Miller, Author, Masters of the Air: America’s Bomber Boys who fought the war against Nazi Germany (Simon and Schuster, 2007), Keith Lowe, Author, Inferno: The Devastation of Hamburg, 1943, (Viking, 2007), Randall Hansen, Author, Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Doubleday, 2008). These books available for sale at the event.

Followed by reception
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6734
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies ( 1 Devonshire Place )
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies and the Canada Chair in Immigration and Governance Studies.

The bombing of cities, from Guernica in 1937, through the Blitz in wartime London, and to Gaza City in 2008, remains among the most controversial ways to wage war. By far, the most hotly debated air raid over the last 100 years was the Feb 13/14 1945 destruction of Dresden by American and British (and therefore Canadian) air forces.  

Bringing together three renowned historians of the air war, the panel will explore the reasons and justification for the bombing of Dresden, whether the action constituted a war crime, and when if every civilians may become legitimate targets of war.

Friday, February 27, 3-5PM
Nira Yuval-Davis, (Professor and Graduate Course Director in Gender, Sexualities and Ethnic Studies, University of East London), “Theatre praxis and the dis/empowering of refugees in London”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7031
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies ( 1 Devonshire Place )
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

Monday, March 2, 2 - 4 pm
Rogers Brubaker (Department of Sociology, UCLA), "Transborder Nationhood and the Politics of Belonging in Germany and Korea"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6768
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies ( 1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Rogers Brubaker has written widely on social theory, immigration, citizenship, nationalism, and ethnicity. His first book explored the idea of rationality in the work of Max Weber, while his essays on Pierre Bourdieu helped introduce Bourdieu to an English-speaking audience. His subsequent work analyzed European nationalism in historical and comparative perspective. Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany (1992) sought to explain the sharply differing ways in which citizenship has been defined vis-à-vis immigrants in France and Germany; Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe (1996) compared contemporary East European nationalisms with those of the interwar period, both emerging after the breakup of multinational states into would-be nation-states. More recently, in a series of analytical essays, many of them collected in Ethnicity without Groups (2004), Brubaker has critically engaged prevailing analytical stances in the study of ethnicity and nationalism and sought to develop alternative analytical resources. His most recent book, Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town, co-authored with Margit Feischmidt, Jon Fox, and Liana Grancea, was published by Princeton University Press in 2006.
Brubaker has taught in the Department of Sociology at UCLA since 1991. Before coming to UCLA, he was a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows of Harvard University (1988-1991). He has been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship (1994-99), a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation (1994-99), and a Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1999-2000). He was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in 1995-96. Brubaker is a Senior Editor of Theory and Society and a member of the Editorial Board of numerous journals. He serves as a Recurring Visiting Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program of the Central European University in Budapest.

Monday, March 9, 4:30- 6:30 pm
Gerhard L. Weinberg, " Kristallnacht as Experienced Then and as Seen Now"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7363
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Presented by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies and the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the support of the Canada Research Chair in Modern German History, Department of History, Centre for Jewish Studies and Joint Initiative in German & European Studies.

Gerhard L. Weinberg was born in 1928 in Hanover, Germany. He served in the US Army in 1946-47, took a history PhD at the University of Chicago, worked on Columbia University’s War Documentation Project, and established the program for microfilming the captured German documents. He taught at the Universities of Chicago, Kentucky, Michigan, and North Carolina, and has served on several US government advisory committees. Now retired, he is the author or editor of ten books including: World in the Balance: Behind the Scenes of World War II; Hitler’s Foreign Policy 1933-1939: The Road to World War II; A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II; Visions of Victory: The Hopes of Eight World War II Leaders; and over 100 chapters, articles, guides to archives, and other publications.

CERES Faculty Speakers' Series: Crossdisciplinary Discussion in Area Studies
Jennnifer Jenkins (Department of History, University of Toronto), "Orientalism and Nationalism, Aryanism and Archaeology: Competing Discourses of Civilization in Germany and Iran"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6150
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, March 12, 4-6 pm
Goldschmidt Memorial Lecture
Sam Weber (Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities Northwestern University), “The Question of Guilt and the Turn toward the Future: Goldschmidt's ‘Guilt from the Standpoint of Judaism’”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6903
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

March 19-20
International Conference:"Twenty Years After: Dealing with the Heritage of Communism" Conference
Program
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7032
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies; Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst (German Academic Exchange Service), Bonn, Germany; Munk Centre for International Studies; Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Washington, D.C.; Gerda Henkel Stiftung; Heinrich Boell Stiftung North America; and the Institute of European Studies.

Monday, March 23, 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Seminar with the German essayist/novelist Zafer Senocak
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7256
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1  Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

Born in Ankara in 1961, Zafer Senocak has been living in Germany since 1970, where he has become a leading voice in the German discussions on multiculturalism, national and cultural identity, and a mediator between Turkish and German culture. The widely published poet, essayist, journalist and editor, has won several prestigious literary awards in Germany. His works have been translated into Turkish, English, French, Dutch, and Hebrew.

Wednesday, April 1, 2-4 pm
Munk-Goethe Writers Residency Reading

Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

The young author Alina Bronsky is the 4th recipient of the Munk-Goethe Writers Residency, which aims to foster German-Canadian exchange on European migration topics. Alina Bronsky, born 1978 in Iekaterinburg/Russia, grew up on the Asian side of the Ural Mountains as well as in Marburg and Darmstadt. After dropping out of her medical studies, she worked as a copywriter and journalist. "Scherbenpark" is her first literary publication and has been released in August 2008.

Her debut "Scherbenpark" is about 17-year-old Sascha who came from Moscow to Germany and lives with her younger brother and sister in the Park of Fragments – a ghetto of high-rise buildings ruled by its own laws which she breaks with fierce determination. She visits the Catholic elite high school, which accepted Sascha because of her giftedness and her precarious living conditions. Sascha is a commuter between two worlds and not at home in either of them but sharp-tongued and precocious enough to stand her ground – and to take the reader with her on a constantly accelerating journey.

Thursday, April 9, 4-6 pm
Andreas Gailus
(Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Michigan),  "Family Resemblance: Nature and Culture in Goethe's 'Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship'"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7455
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Andreas Gailus is author of /Passions of the Sign: Revolution and Language in Kant, Goethe, and Kleist/ (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006).

April 19-2, 2009
2nd Annual Toronto German Studies Symposium

Staging Minority Voices: Turks & Jews Performing in Germany Website:http://chass.utoronto.ca/german/downloads/GermanSymposiumPoster09.pdf
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6805
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, the Al and Malka Green Yiddish Studies Program, the Goethe-Institut Toronto, the Center for Jewish Studies and the Menachovsky Memorial lecture, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Graduate
Centre for Study of Drama, and The Munk Centre for International Studies.

Thursday, April 23, 4 - 6 pm
Sven Oliver Müller (University of Bielefeld; European University Institute, Florence), "Music Reception and the Writing of European Cultural History" 
No registration required.
Website: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~retallac/Mueller_Music_23_Apr_09.pdf
Room 2098, History Department Conference Room, Sidney Smith Hall, 2nd floor, 100 St. George St.
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Website: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~retallac/Mueller_Music_23_Apr_09.pdf  

Dr.Sven Oliver Müller is an acknowledged expert in the history of culture and cultural transfers in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe. He has conducted research and initiated collaborative projects on the musical cultures of European cities, musical theatre, and the "politics of opera" - all from local, national, and transnational perspectives.

After receiving his PhD from the University of Bielefeld in 2001, Müller's first book was Die Nation als Waffe und Vorstellung. Nationalismus in Deutschland und Grossbritannien im Ersten Weltkrieg. More recently he co-edited a Festschrift for his former supervisor, Hans-Ulrich Wehler, Das deutsche Kaiserreich in der Kontroverse, which will be published next year in English translation by Berghahn Books. Müller is currently a visiting scholar at Columbia University as a Feodor Lynen Fellow of the Humboldt Foundation.   
    

Tuesday, September 15, 2009. 3:30-5:00 pm
Careers without Borders: A Talk with Ambassador Anne-Marie Bourcier "Canada's Relations with Portugal"
Room 208N, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Ambassador Bourcier will be talking about career paths and opportunities in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  She is currently Canada's Ambassador to Portugal and will also touch on Canada-Portugal relations.                   

Monday, September 28, 2-4 pm
DAAD Information Session
Dr. Alexandra Hausstein (Director, DAAD Information Centre, Toronto), Jessica Denenberg (DAAD Information Centre, Toronto), Erika Loney (International Student Exchange Office, University of Toronto)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8089
Room 108N, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

An information session on applying for graduate study and research fellowships through the German Academic Exchange Service.

Thursday, October 1, 2-6 pm
Symposium: Rereading Friedrich Schlegel’s Theory of Romanticism:
In the Wake of Hans Eichner
2 pm    Prof. Dr. Hermann Patsch (Munich), “Hans Eichners Bedeutung für die Romantik-Forschung”
3pm     Coffee Break
3:15pm Round Table Discussion with Alan Bewell (English), Claudia Brodksy (Princeton University), Paul Franks (Philosophy), Willi Goetschel (German and Philosophy), and Hermann Patsch.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7811
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies and the German Department

Monday, October 5, 2-4 pm
Ruth Mandel (Department of Anthropology, University College London), "Turks, Jews and Germans: Blood-law, land-law, and citizenship practices"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7926
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Ruth Mandel received her PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago; she  teaches anthropology at University College London. Her book Cosmopolitan Anxieties:  Turkish challenges to citizenship and belonging in Germany was recently published by Duke University Press (2008).  She has published widely about migration in Germany, primarily focusing on Turks, Islam, and the new German and Jewish migrations from the former Soviet Union. She currently is writing a book about research she carried out in post-Soviet Kazakhstan, about international development aid and soap opera.  She is also involved in a collaborative project, funded by the National Science Foundation (Washington, D. C.),  on internally displaced persons in the Republic of Georgia.  Another project is an edited collection, based on a series of international workshops she organized at the Kennan Institute in Washington, on  critiques of international development policy in the former Soviet Union. She has been a Berlin Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and was a Title VIII Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, D. C.  She is the recipient of many research grants, including Arts and Humanities Research Board, Economic and Social Research Council, DAAD, Fulbright, Fulbright-Hays, Social Science Research Council, IREX, Wenner-Gren, and Charlotte Newcombe. 

Tuesday, October 13, 2-4 pm
Karen Schönwälder
(Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity), “The Political Participation of Migrants in European Societies”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7929
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance .

The talk discusses key features of the political incorporation of immigrants into host society structures and institutions. It begins with theoretical considerations of the specifics of political, as distinct from e.g. economic or social, integration. A further section outlines trends in political participation arguing that a participation gap is likely to persist in the coming decades. Nevertheless, an increasing number of individualswith a migration background are appearing on the parliamentary stages of major European immigration countries. The paper identifies nationally specific constellations that enabled such careers and that shape the development of immigrant political elites in Britain, France, the Netherlands and Germany. Although we can record slow progress, equal representation is unlikely to be achieved without determined intervention.

Thursday, October 15, 5-8 pm
Roundtable “The Forgotten Titanic: The Sinking of the MV Wilhelm Gustloff”
and screening of a documentary "Sinking The Gustloff: A Tragedy Exiled From Memory" (produced, written and directed by Marcus Kolga)
Chair: Randall Hansen (University of Toronto, Author Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany, Doubleday 2009 )
Participants: Alfred-Maurice de Zayas (Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations), Ed Morgan (University of Toronto)
The event will be attended by Marcus Kolga (film director) and Horst Woit, the Gustloff survivor featured in the film.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7653
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

When a Soviet submarine sunk the Wilhelm Gustloff, a passenger ship fleeing East Prussia, on January 30, 1945, 9000 people died. The majority of them were children. It was the single greatest maritime disaster in history – by contrast, 1,500 people died following the sinking of the Titanic. This gripping documentary tells the story of the Gustloff’s sinking and poses a question that will be debated by two distinguished professors of law: was it war, or a war crime?

Tuesday, October 20, 10am -12 pm
Silvia Marzagalli (Université de Nice), "Hamburg in the Napoleonic Period: The Difficult Application of the Continental Blockade in a Major Trading Center"
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8039
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies and Centre d'études de la France et du Monde francophone at the University of Toronto.

Tuesday, October 27, 12-2 pm
When Two Become One -- Twenty Years After the German Re-Unification.
A Reading and Discussion with Writer Ingo Schulze. Moderated by Wolfram Eilenberger.
Registration:
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Friday, October 30, 2-4 pm
Roundtable “Immigrants and Publics: Public Attitudes to Europe in Germany, Europe, and the US ”
Gary P. Freeman (University of Texas at Austin), David Leal (University of Texas at Austin), Randall Hansen (University of Toronto)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8156
Room 208N, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance.

November 5, 4-6 pm
Christian Joppke (The American University of Paris), "Citizenship and Immigration: Toward a Liberal Model"
Combination Room, Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

Christian Joppke is a Professor of Politics at the American University of Paris.  Holding a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley (1989), he previously taught at the University of Southern California, the European University Institute, the University of British Columbia, and International University Bremen. He was also a visiting scholar at Georgetown University and the Russell Sage Foundation in New York. He is a leading scholar on immigration and citizenship. Recent books include Citizenship and Immigration (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010); Veil: Mirror of Identity (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2009) and Selecting by Origin: Ethnic Migration in the Liberal State (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2005). His current research interest is in the accommodation of Islam in Western societies.

Friday, November 6, 2-4 pm
Geoffrey Giles
(University of Florida), “Gay Nazis on Campus? The Puzzling Evidence from Hamburg during the Third Reich “
Registration:
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies, Canada Research Chair in Modern German History, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

By a curious chance, the three professors who were brought into the University of Hamburg at the start of the Third Reich specifically in order to nazify the curriculum, were all on different occasions a few years later arrested on separate charges of homosexual offences, and dismissed.  Was this merely a coincidence, or does it indicate a tendency for National Socialist stalwarts to be gay?  Or were the charges trumped up by opponents of the Nazis, in order to get rid of these ideological fanatics.  The presentation explores this conundrum through a detailed examination of each case. This event is a part of Holocaust Education Week.

Friday, November 6, 2-4 pm
Roundtable on the 10th Anniversary of Germany's Citizenship Reform. Participants: Sandra Bucerius, Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto; Andreas Fahrmeir, History, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main; Christian Joppke, Department of International and Comparative Politics, American University of Paris; Eli Nathans, Department of History, University of Western Ontario.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7627
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

This roundtable marks the 10th anniversary of the reform of Germany’s citizenship law.  The new law introduced a territorial dimension (jus soli) to Germany’s nationality policy, whereby children of legally resident foreigners born in Germany received German citizenship at birth.  Up until the passage of the reform, these children would have been classified as foreigners, because of the predominance of the principle of descent (jus sanguinis) in Germany’s nationality law.  Roundtable participants will discuss the origins of the law, the degree to which it truly marks a break with past practice and its relation to prevailing feelings of national belonging, especially among second and third-generation immigrant youth.

Wednesday, November 11, 9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Research in Germany - Info Session for Graduates and Researchers
Followed by Reception and Networking 12:30 – 2:00 pm
Participants: Dr. Norbert Koenig, Dr. Barbara Hellebrandt, Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF); Dr. Alexandra Hausstein, Peter Kerrigan, Jessica Denenberg, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD); Dr. Berthold Neizert, Max Planck Society (MPG) N.N., Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (AvH), Megan Brenn-White, Hessen Universities Consortium New York, Regina Sonntag-Krupp, University of Konstanz;
Dr. Gabrielle Siegers, University of Toronto, DAAD Research Ambassador.
Registration: daadca@daad.org Please RSVP before November 6, 2009
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

This workshop is targeted towards graduate, doctoral, and postdoctoral students, as well as faculty, and will provide information on academic programmes and research opportunities in Germany. Tips will be given on how to find the right academic fit in Germany, how to get a doctoral or postdoc position, and how to develop an independent academic career and establish a research team. The session will assess current developments in German higher education and explore different funding opportunities. The Info Tour Canada 2009 is organized by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

Monday, November 16, 6-8 pm
Gerhard Weinberg ( Professor Emeritus of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “Pope Pius XII in World War II: The Pope and Systematic Slaughter of Civilians During the War”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8346
George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place             
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Gerhard Weinberg is a German-born American diplomatic and military historian noted for his studies in the history of World War II. Weinberg currently is the William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his MA (1949) and PhD (1951) in history from the University of Chicago. Weinberg's early masterpiece was the two-volume history of Hitler's diplomatic preparations for war: The Foreign Policy of Hitler's Germany (1970 and 1980; republished 1994). In 1994, he published a 1000-page one-volume history of the Second World War, A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II. Weinberg continued his studies of the World War II era after the publication of his general history by examining each of the major wartime leaders’ visions for a post-victory world. It was published in 2005 as Visions of Victory: The Hopes of Eight World War II Leaders.

Tuesday, November 17, 12-2 pm
Gerhard Weinberg ( Professor Emeritus of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “The Treaty of Versailles: Another Look”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8328
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies. Lunch will be provided.

Wednesday, November 18, 5-7 pm
Gerhard Weinberg ( Professor Emeritus of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “German Resistance to Hitler: New Issues”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8327
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

Tuesday, December 1, 7 pm
Stefan Aust (Editor-in-chief of Der Spiegel, 1994-2008; author of the book & co-author of the screenplay The Baader Meinhof Complex. Host of the talk & public discussion: Russell Smith, author and journalist The Globe and Mail
Registration: office@toronto.goethe.org
Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Avenue, University of Toronto
Sponsored by the Goethe-Institut Toronto with the support of The Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

Thursday, December 3, 4-6 pm
Christopher Young (Chair, Department of German, University of Cambridge), "Ulrich von Liechtenstein - a Medieval Author and the Problems of German Literary History in the Nineteenth Century"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7627
Room 108N, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, and Centre for Medieval Studies.

 

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