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PAST EVENTS

2008

Thursday, September 18, 2008, 5-7 pm
Andreas Fahrmeir (Universität Frankfurt), "How different was Germany? Defining citizens and citizens' rights, 1919-1960"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6620
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies and the Canada Chair in Immigration and Governance Studies.

It is frequently alleged that German definitions of citizenship and the administration of nationality law were all but unique in the western world. Their focus on descent rather than the place of birth or the will to belong to the nation had nineteenth-century roots, but became particularly pronounced in the interwar period, the Third Reich, and the Federal Republic. The paper will argue that the story is more complicated. In part, because the evaluation of the German experience changes, depending on how citizenship is conceptualized, and because some developments in Germany mirrored decisions elsewhere.

Friday, September 19, 5-7 pm
Midwest German History Workshop
Keynote speaker: Geoff Eley (University of Michigan)
, "Empire by Land or Sea? Germany's Imperial Imaginary, 1850-1945"
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6188
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and the Department of History. 

Saturday, September 20, 9:00 am-6 pm
Midwest German History Workshop
PROGRAM

Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6188
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and the Department of History. 

Wednesday, October 8, 2 - 4 pm
Sabine Schleiermacher (Institute for Medicine History, Berlin), "Reordering "Raum" and "Rasse." Generalplan Ost, Science and the Holocaust"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6812
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

October 15-17
Conference “Science, Planning, Expulsion: The National Socialist General Plan for the East”
Program
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6485
The Eric Arthur Gallery, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design,
230 College Street, University of Toronto
The Symposium is funded by the University of Toronto (Office of the Dean, Faculty of Arts & Science; The Joint Initiative in German and European Studies; the Ray and Rose Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies; Munk Centre for International Studies; Department of History; Office of the Dean, University of Toronto at Scarborough; and the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design) and the German Research Association. 

Thursday, October 16, 2-5 pm
Constituting Immigrant Subjects through Immigrant Integration Discourses and Practices in the Netherlands and Germany

Marnie Bjornson, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto
Sancra Bucerius, Centre for Criminology, University of Toronto
Phil Triadafilopoulos, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
Anna Korteweg, Department of Sociology,University of Toronto
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

This two-hour session will start off with two brief presentations by Marnie Bjornson (Dept. of Anthropology) and Sandra Bucerius (Centre for Criminology) on the ways in which Muslim immigrants are constructed and construct themselves as members (or not) of majority society. Marnie Bjornson analyzes the Netherlands' new immigrant incorporation regime in the context of the risk society. The contemporary 'integration' regime casts multiculturalism as the greatest risk to 'social cohesion' and produces Muslim immigrants as new subjects of blame. Integration is made auditable through standardized language testing and such technologies of audit manage the activities, not merely of risky immigrants, but also of the teaching professionals who develop and administer them. Sandra Bucerius’ ethnographic research among drug dealing street gang in Frankfurt, Germany shows that a strong local identification can serve as a coping strategy for 2nd generation immigrants who struggle not only with a socially excluding and xenophobic German society, but also with their perception of their parents’ fear of becoming alienated from their Germanized children. These second generation immigrants experience social exclusion in the educational system and in the still-closed German citizenship regime, to the point where they are permanently labeled as foreigners and migrants. This has led them to create a positive sense of self through a strong local identification that has begun to eclipse other identities, especially ethnicity.  These two presentations will serve as a starting point for a discussion on the ways in which immigrants, particularly of Muslim descent, are and are not conceived off as subjects and citizens in their new home countries.

Sunday, November 2
Emilia Galotti Symposium

Event website: http://www.uc.utoronto.ca/content/view/515/2524/
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Jackman Humanities Institute of the University of Toronto, in cooperation with the following academic units: Centre for Comparative Literature; University College Drama Program; Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama; Joint Initiative of German and European Studies; Department of German, Faculty of Arts & Science and the Goethe Institute, Toronto.

Wednesday, November 12, 2-4 pm
Kristin Kopp (University of Missouri), “ Mapping Eastern Europe as German Colonial Space: Persuasive  Cartography and Territorial Expansionism During the Interwar Period ”Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies

Kristin Kopp is an assistant professor of German studies at the University of Missouri, Columbia.  Her research focuses on German-Polish cultural history, German colonialism, and German film.  She is currently completing a book manuscript investigating the construction of Poland as German colonial space in the 19th and 20th centuries.  She is co-editor of Die Großstadt und das Primitive: Text, Politik, Repräsentation (Metzler, 2004), which investigates the use of colonial categories to map urban space in the European metropolis at the turn of the century; Peter Altenberg: Ashantee. Afrika und Wien um 1900 (Löcker, 2008), on the most famous German-language text to depict the colonial “people shows” popular at the turn of the century; and a co-edited volume on contemporary instrumentalizations of memory narratives in German and Polish politics, culture, and commerce.

Friday, November 14, 9:00 am-6:30 pm
Workshop “Liberalism, Secularism & Integration in Germany & Europe”
Program
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies, the Institute of European Studies, and the Canada Chair in Immigration and Governance Studies.

Thursday, November 20, 2 - 4 pm
Workshop
The Rise of Immigrant Integration Policy in Europe: Drawing Boundaries of Belonging in the Civic Nation
Speakers: Anna Korteweg (Department of Sociology, University of Toronto)
Phil Triadafilopoulos (Department of Political Science, University of Toronto)
Discussant: Joe Carens (Department of Political Science, University of Toronto)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6120
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Joint initiative in German and European Studies.

This workshop explores the idea of civic nation-building through a comparative discussion of integration politics and policy-making in Germany and the Netherlands. We hope to highlight both the broadly encompassing forces driving policy convergence and country-specific factors that have led to a surprising degree of variation between the two cases. In particular, we wish to explore how gender and sexuality have come to be implicated with liberal-democratic identity formation, often with the effect of excluding minority religious groups whose beliefs and practices are deemed “pre-modern” and thus illiberal. The workshop will be of interest to anyone interested in the politics of immigration and citizenship, the future of multiculturalism, and the tension filled relationship between freedom of religion and other core liberal-democratic principles, such as gender equality.

November 16 - 30
Eh! U Meet The Europeans - 4th Annual European Film Festival, Toronto
Meet the Europeans: the European Union celebrates its cultural variety with the 4th European Film Festival in Toronto.
Once again you will have the opportunity to see over 30 films from 23 European countries representing the diversity and creativity of today's European culture on recent feature films! With a line-up that includes an abundance of national hits, international successes and prize winners, we are thrilled to show a full slate of exciting premieres from across the Atlantic.
All screenings in original language with English subtitles. Admission is free.
The complete film line up can be seen from the press release available at: http://www.eutorontofilmfest.ca/

Wednesday, December 3, 4-6 pm
Jennifer V. Evans
(Carleton University), “Decriminalization, Seduction, and 'Unnatural Desire' in the German Democratic Republic”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7004\
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

Exploring the shifts and changes in regulatory mechanisms through the prism of gender, youth, and sexuality, Jennifer Evans questions the notion that the decriminalization of same-sex sexuality in 1968 represented a triumph of the sexual revolution in East Germany. Instead, she examines how difficult the postwar negotiation of intimacy and identity was in relation to gay male sexuality. Decriminalization, while realizing a private sphere of intimacy for adult men, came at a cost for youths, whose actions, relationships, and identities were subjected to invasive monitoring via age of consent regulations and protective discourses of containment. Although homosexuality emerged as a public subject of debate, hard fought changes in the law did not always serve as a counterbalance to lingering notions of homophobia. 1970s fears about young men's sexuality increased state involvement in the private sphere; but efforts to manage "unnatural desire" (in German/ widernatürliche Unzucht/) also had a generative effect, injecting multiple discourses of masculinity in to public discourse, creating conditions for greater surveillance/ and/ social organization.

October 15-December 13 (FREE ADMISSION)
Exhibition “Science, Planning, Expulsion: The National Socialist General Plan for the East”
(Event Release)
The Eric Arthur Gallery, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design,
230 College Street, University of Toronto

The General Plan for the East (GPO) embodied the Nazi vision for a radical reorganization – racial, spatial, demographic, settlement patterns – of Eastern Europe. The reorganization would see the expulsion (“resettlement”) to the east of “culturally and racially inferior” populations, the remaking of the east European landscape through the construction of prototypical Germanized villages, and the creation of an effective agrarian society, with decentralized industry and settlement structures. Presented to Heinrich Himmler in July of 1941, the GPO was arguably the most far-reaching and violent experiment in the use of the tools of scientific planning to re-shape society. Organized and sponsored by the German Research Association (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), this exhibition will be shown outside of Germany for the first time at the University of Toronto. The show was originally mounted in numerous cities in Germany in 2007/2008.

 

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